Great
North
Woods

Spotlight map of Great North Woods region Maine

The Great North Woods, also known simply as the North Country, is more wild than its southern region counterparts, but not quite as remote as the Maine regions to its east and north. Nevertheless, with a population of about 30,000 (about one third of it in Berlin where the logging and paper manufacture is centered), and with roads no bigger than two lanes, it’s not exactly a bustling resort area, either.

It is a place of lakes, rivers, forests of spruce and balsam fir, and people who enjoy the tranquility and adventure of the great outdoors. Dark skies, especially to the east, provide dazzling, star studded night skies. Come here for hunting, fishing, camping, backcountry hiking, ATVing and snowmobiling on hundreds of groomed trails, cross-country skiing, and of course, wildlife watching. Moose, deer and bear roam freely – one area in particular, Route 3 between Pittsburg to the Canadian border, is known as Moose Alley. 

The Connecticut lakes in the most northern part of the region form the headwaters for the Connecticut River (the longest in New England). They are named apparently by size rather than order, as the First Connecticut Lake is the largest and farthest south, while the fourth, tiny and rather inaccessible, belying its importance to that grand river, nestles quietly near the Canadian border.

Glorious, fabled Dixville notch lies a bit further south and offers up not only the stupendous mountain views, but also the the head dizzying Table Rock, and beautiful Lake Gloriette, presided over by the historic Balsams Resort one of the old grand resorts (sadly no more). 

Come here to play in the wilderness.

Photo of Dixville Notch from Table Rock
A view of Dixville Notch from way up on Table Rock: gotjen, CC BY 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons
A Tichnor Brothers postcard of The Balsams, Lake Gloriette and Dixville Notch
The Balsams presides over Lake Gloriette in Dixville Notch: Tichnor Brothers, Publisher, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons