The
Maine
Highlands

Spotlight map of The Maine Highlands region Maine

Full of superlatives, The Maine Highlands boasts the state’s highest peak (Katahdin), its largest lake (Moosehead) and its longest river (Penobscot). Come for the waterfalls, endless trails for hiking, biking, skiing, snowmobiling, ATVing, and wildlife viewing. Come canoe, kayak or fish on the multitude of lakes and rivers. Come for the snowmobiling and dogsledding. Come for the fairs and festivals. Come to Bangor for art and culture:  Symphony Orchestra? Check. Art museums & galleries? Check. History? Check. Food scene? Check. Nightlife (and I don’t mean owls)? Check.

It’s hard to tear you away from the coast, I know. But how could you resist?

The Maine Highlands claims the center of this large State of Maine, and begins with Bangor as its gateway to its most famous wilderness areas. Once the world’s largest lumberport with over 150 sawmills along the Penobscot River, Bangor is now better known for being the home of horror writer Stephen King. A small, attractive city, with a population of just over 30,000, it has a thriving arts, food and shopping scene. With an international airport, it’s a great place to spend a day or two before heading north into the wilds or south and east to the Penobscot Bay area and Bar Harbor.

But north we will go. In just an hour and a half from Bangor, you can be in Greenville, in the heart of the Highlands, at the southern end of Moosehead Lake. From here, the wilderness playground is at your beck and call, along with steamboat tours around the lake, moose safaris, or just sitting back to gaze at the star-strewn dark night sky. 

The Maine Highlands beckons you.

Photo of Mount Katahdin from South Twin Lake
Mount Katahdin, Maine's highest peak: DrStew82, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons
Photo of Paul Bunyan statue in Bangor
Paul Bunyan stands tall in Bangor: Owlsmcgee, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons